FishWrasses

The red and white African Clown Wrasse, Coris gaimard!!

Coris gaimard also known as the Clown Wrasse or the African farmosa. They can be found on almost every reef in the Indo-Pacific, Hawaiian and the Red Sea at a depth of 50 m. This species is very popular in the aquarium trade and is popular species for display in public aquariums.

Adult gaimard can easily grow to a foot long in the wild. As the juvenile grows in to adult it completely changes its color from red and white to greenish with blue dots and yellow tail.

Coris Wrasse is a very active fish when on the surface as they can disappear in the substrate for days. Upon introducing it for the first time into the aquarium it may stay buried for days. It simply awaits when to emerge. Once emerges it will arise the next morning at almost the exact same time every day.

Checkout the video below;

The Red Coris Wrasse requires larger aquarium with sand substrate and rock work which it uses to burrow to sleep. Coris gaimard is a Semi-aggressive fish as a juvenile is peaceful and can be destructive as adult, keeping with invertebrates should be with caution as it will eat small fish, snails, sea stars, crabs and shrimp.

Coris gaimard requires a meaty diet including brine shrimp and other meaty type marine-based frozen and fresh foods along with good quality marine flake and marine pellet food and should be fed multiple times in a day. It’s a great colorful fish to keep in our aquarium.

Shaan

Like always it's my day one in the hobby. Always been a hobbyist but never knew would dive so deep in the hobby. I too started with a freshwater aquarium. When I first started saltwater aquarium it just grew on me and I knew that had to do more in this hobby. I am a Post-Grad in Business Administration have worked with Coldstar Logistics, Amazon and Jindal's before jumping completely in the ocean. Other than aquarium hobby I have my interests in travel, digital games and consumer web technology.

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